Fashion Campaign Analysis: Chloe FW '18

As a photographer who loves movement, I can fully appreciate the Chloe campaigns. You’re never visually bored with how they’re captured, and the energy continues to be effervescent in their Fall Winter ‘18 campaign.

Chloe’s Creative Director, Natacha Ramsay-Levi, was inspired by 70’s cinema and mentioned Anjelica Huston, Stéphane Audran, and Sissy Spacek as the muses when the collection debuted. Ramsay-Levi has been with the label less than a year and is already making big strides. In her latest collection, she reconstructed everyday clothing such as deep v’s and drop waists too elongate the female form. The fluidity of the garments is the perfect balance of editorial to streetwear.

Steven Meisel photographed and filmed the campaign that took place on a Brooklyn pier. The film opens up with a model riding a bike amidst the New York skyline then closes in on the remaining models amongst colorfully painted slabs of concrete. The muted colors and sleek hair and makeup are mesmerizing and elevate the garments. As the scene progresses you see the models strutting up a ramp and interacting with one another almost as if they’re on the street. Here you see the contrast between the catwalk and everyday life that creates a friendly, neighborhood vibe. This sequence is replayed three times. The use of repetition trains the viewer’s eye where to look and allows them to notice different details each time. The photographs are film stills that continue to emphasize motion. As we can see, Ramsay-Levi’s vision is effectively communicated through Meisel’s work.

Ramsay-Levi has carefully curated a brand that is raw and real. Instead of creating a lifestyle Chloe is shaping a feeling and capturing a moment. This works well with high fashion because it creates longevity. Older and newer generations can always connect with the brand. As the label continues to be shaped by new hands they’ll never lose touch with how they make a woman feel.

Fashion Campaign Analysis: Gucci FW18 "The Collectors"

Gucci, Gucci, Gucci. The label has reigned supreme the past two years, and they aren’t letting up quite yet. Their latest campaign “The Collectors,” pays tribute to the Gucci tribe of outsiders who are “imagined as a group of collectors of art and artefacts.” This group of extraordinary individuals has met at a grand dinner in Austria to celebrate their unique identities that will hopefully come to life in a fashion film that has yet to be released.

Art director Christopher Simmonds and photographer Glen Luchford were given the task of interpreting the FW18 collection. Gucci has such an eclectic, luxurious style I have a sense that the inspiration came from the idea that their clothing is a collectible in itself. Emphasizing that every person has at least one thing they indulge in, and it’s something to share with pride. I think with a lot of Gucci’s campaigns there is much room for interpretation, which is why it sits well with so many consumers. Not to mention, Alessandro Michele took his role of Creative Director at Gucci in 2015, which became a pivotal moment for them. Ever since Michele has re-energized and re-imagined the label. Gucci has become a leader in storytelling. Always taking it to the next level.

There is this idea of narrative that I think brings fashion to life. As an art director, photographer, stylist, hair and makeup artist, model, etc. you have to emulate the brand within its current collection. If we break it down to its core the vision often starts with the clothing including insight from someone like Michele on his inspirations for the collection. Here you see the color palettes, details, and fabrics used in the clothing that will ultimately help shape the narrative. From there every piece of the campaign must come together to tell the same story. Model casting is key. Location scouting is key. Hair and make up is key. If one thing is off it can ruin everything. Example being, 90s grunge styled hair and makeup probably won’t look good on a model wearing a long chiffon dress at French château. You would want a softer, paired down look to compliment the pieces. However, something like this can be done to create contrast, but you would have to pull it off really, really well. Ultimately, all campaigns create an experience for the viewer and it can be mediocre or great. We want the latter.

Bringing together the talents of Michele, Simmonds, Luchford, and their team members is obviously going to create phenomenal work. Together they have created a brand that keeps us waiting and wanting to see more every season. And, I think that’s the goal, for the story to be never-ending.